We have an interest in sorting out the fact from the fable. If you already have documentary evidence etc then tell us and show us.

Now if anyone of you have "odd bits" in your basement, shop cellar or whatever and would welcome us to do a peek then feel free to tell us at our facebook group .

Random articles of interest

Borehole drilling

borehole image

Borehole drilling is a technique that allows you to access underground water sources by creating a deep and narrow hole in the ground. In this blog post, we will explain what borehole drilling is, how it works, and what are its benefits and challenges.

What is borehole drilling?

Read more: Borehole drilling

The Punch house

punch house pub

ON THE south side of East Street, close to the Market Cross, lies number 92 which up until fairly recently was The Royal Arms public house (also known as Ye Olde Punch House).

Although the façade dates to the Georgian era, the building is of a timber-framed construction said to date from the 16th century.

 Much of the original building survives including highly decorated plaster ceilings displaying the Tudor Rose and fleur-de-lis.

 It was once a private town house belonging to the Lumley family of Stansted.

Read more: The Punch house

Doline – Chichester To Westbourne

Doline  – Chichester To Westbourne

doline

 Brandy Hole Lane, East Broyle Copse area in the northwest part of Chichester. A well-developed doline line extends east-west across the area to the north of Brandy Hole Lane, along the underlying Chalk-Reading Beds boundary.


The Environment Agency has made 1m-resolution LIDAR imagery coverage for large areas of England and Wales freely available on the internet under Open Government Licence (www.lidarfinder.com).

Read more: Doline – Chichester To Westbourne

Brandy Hole caving session

From trying to locate the areas marked on the old maps as smugglers or roman caves at the approc following locations. Our team tried to take photos as best we could.

 

su 85228 06608 50.8527, -0.7906
su 85255 06596 50.8526, -0.7902
su 85249 06577 50.8524, -0.7903
su 85248 06565 50.8523, -0.7903
su 85329 06661 50.8532, -0.7892
su 85359 06657 50.8531, -0.7887

 

 

27 East street

MB
My mum worked 27 east street and when it flooded in the 90s they found a big cellar and you could look down into an area which was like a tunnel

Summersdale FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE

FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE.

A singular happening lay behind the prosaic news on saturday that the
chuichester and District League football fixture, Summersadale VS Boxgrove, had o be postponed
owing to the ground on this hill suburb of Chichester being unfit.

Read more: Summersdale FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE

building a cellar

cellar image

Historically, to build a house with a simple cellar you would dig out the ground to a depth of around 6ft, the cellar walls would have been constructed with a lining of stone or brick and with a drain for water within the cellar. The floors would have been built up on crushed stone or sand to provide a level surface and paved, usually with flags. Brick paving became more common in later periods.

Read more: building a cellar

Graylingwell plan with well and springs ponds

Graylingwell plan with well and springs ponds.

Read more: Graylingwell plan with well and springs ponds

researching properties using the council planning system

An introduction to researching properties

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