An introduction to researching properties

Random articles of interest

Brandy Hole caving session

From trying to locate the areas marked on the old maps as smugglers or roman caves at the approc following locations. Our team tried to take photos as best we could.

 

su 85228 06608 50.8527, -0.7906
su 85255 06596 50.8526, -0.7902
su 85249 06577 50.8524, -0.7903
su 85248 06565 50.8523, -0.7903
su 85329 06661 50.8532, -0.7892
su 85359 06657 50.8531, -0.7887

 

 

40 east street

EAST STREET No 40
SU 8604 NW 4/103
Grade II
C18. 3 storeys and attic. 2 windows. Red brick.

Panelled parapet hiding
dormers. Sash windows in reveals in flat arches; rubbed brick voussoirs; glazing bars missing in lower windows.

C20 plate glass shop front and fascia on ground floor.

Read more: 40 east street

Summersdale FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE

FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE.

A singular happening lay behind the prosaic news on saturday that the
chuichester and District League football fixture, Summersadale VS Boxgrove, had o be postponed
owing to the ground on this hill suburb of Chichester being unfit.

Read more: Summersdale FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE

peterborough tunnels

One of the most common questions I’m asked about Peterborough’s history is whether there are any tunnels under the city. Local legends say that there is a tunnel stretching from the Cathedral to Monk’s Cave at Longthorpe. Similar tunnels are alleged to stretch from the Cathedral to the abbeys at Thorney or Crowland.

 

These are familiar myths in many historic cities across the UK, mostly urban legends based on half remembrances of sewers, cellars or crawlspaces, coupled with wishful thinking and rumour.

 

The stories of tunnels from Peterborough to

Read more: peterborough tunnels

Graylingwell Heritage Project

 'Graylingwell Heritage Project', 'graylingwell-heritage-project', '

BENEATH THE WATER TOWER

The Graylingwell Heritage Project has been a community based heritage and arts programme located in Chichester, West Sussex.

The original Victorian buildings had a central boiler house with the water tower which is, after the Cathedral spire, by far the tallest building in Chichester. And if you go up to the Trundle and look down on Chichester, the only two buildings you can see are the Cathedral spire and the Graylingwell water tower.

Read more: Graylingwell Heritage Project

Doline – Chichester To Westbourne

Doline  – Chichester To Westbourne

doline

 Brandy Hole Lane, East Broyle Copse area in the northwest part of Chichester. A well-developed doline line extends east-west across the area to the north of Brandy Hole Lane, along the underlying Chalk-Reading Beds boundary.


The Environment Agency has made 1m-resolution LIDAR imagery coverage for large areas of England and Wales freely available on the internet under Open Government Licence (www.lidarfinder.com).

Read more: Doline – Chichester To Westbourne

It was under the Crypt and right next to the cathedral

inside buttery

Maureen Williams, 82, of Westgate, recalled a school trip into the rumoured tunnels under Chichester when she was at Chichester High School for Girls.

 

She estimates she was in her early teens at the time and said she chose to share her memories after reading about the search for evidence in this newspaper.

Read more: It was under the Crypt and right next to the cathedral

tunnels underneath Hansford Menswear

A number of those readers remembered a story about tunnels underneath Hansford Menswear, also in South Street, so we spoke the shop's owner to find out more Matthew Hansford described a blocked-off passage in cellar of the shop, which he believes may have led to the cathedral

.

Read more: tunnels underneath Hansford Menswear

The Punch house

punch house pub

ON THE south side of East Street, close to the Market Cross, lies number 92 which up until fairly recently was The Royal Arms public house (also known as Ye Olde Punch House).

Although the façade dates to the Georgian era, the building is of a timber-framed construction said to date from the 16th century.

 Much of the original building survives including highly decorated plaster ceilings displaying the Tudor Rose and fleur-de-lis.

 It was once a private town house belonging to the Lumley family of Stansted.

Read more: The Punch house

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