Random articles of interest

Doline – Chichester To Westbourne

Doline  – Chichester To Westbourne

doline

 Brandy Hole Lane, East Broyle Copse area in the northwest part of Chichester. A well-developed doline line extends east-west across the area to the north of Brandy Hole Lane, along the underlying Chalk-Reading Beds boundary.


The Environment Agency has made 1m-resolution LIDAR imagery coverage for large areas of England and Wales freely available on the internet under Open Government Licence (www.lidarfinder.com).

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Summersdale Neighbourhood Character Appraisal

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Summersdale is an attractive area in the north of Chichester. Spacious
and leafy, the character of the area is now under threat with many houses
on large plots at risk of demolition and re-development. It is an historic
suburb with high quality architecture in street scenes that are worthy of
enlightened protection.


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Graylingwell plan with well and springs ponds

Graylingwell plan with well and springs ponds.

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building a cellar

cellar image

Historically, to build a house with a simple cellar you would dig out the ground to a depth of around 6ft, the cellar walls would have been constructed with a lining of stone or brick and with a drain for water within the cellar. The floors would have been built up on crushed stone or sand to provide a level surface and paved, usually with flags. Brick paving became more common in later periods.

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Summersdale FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE

FOOTBALL FIELD SURPRISE.

A singular happening lay behind the prosaic news on saturday that the
chuichester and District League football fixture, Summersadale VS Boxgrove, had o be postponed
owing to the ground on this hill suburb of Chichester being unfit.

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The Punch house

punch house pub

ON THE south side of East Street, close to the Market Cross, lies number 92 which up until fairly recently was The Royal Arms public house (also known as Ye Olde Punch House).

Although the façade dates to the Georgian era, the building is of a timber-framed construction said to date from the 16th century.

 Much of the original building survives including highly decorated plaster ceilings displaying the Tudor Rose and fleur-de-lis.

 It was once a private town house belonging to the Lumley family of Stansted.

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An Archaeological Evaluation at Roussillon Barracks

An Archaeological Evaluation atRoussillon Barracks Chichester, West Sussex

 

Planning Reference No: CC/10/03490/FUL Phases 1a & 1b Project No: 4861 Site Code: RBC 11ASE Report No: 2011128 OASIS id: archaeol6-102472 By Diccon HartWith contributions by Sarah Porteus Illustrations by Fiona GriffinJune 2011

 

 

ABSOLUTE ARCHAEOLOGY Rousillonn Barracks Evaluation

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AArc141/14/EVAL Roussillon Park, Broyle Road, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 BBL

Sporadic finds represent the early prehistoric period in the vicinity of the Project Site, with
the discovery of Palaeolithic axe in a garden on Brandy Hole Lane (c. 600m to the NW)
and a Neolithic stone axe, in the vicinity of Spitalfield Lane, over 1km to the SE (Lee 2008:
9).

Bronze Age activity has been recorded c. 500m to the east of the site, in the vicinity of
Garyiingwell Hospital, where evidence for settlement was identified along with remains of
six cremation burials (Lee 2008: 9).

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Russilon Barracks

The Chichester SMR holds information for 48 sites, whilst the National Monuments Record
Centre holds details of a further 16 sites within the study area. An additional four sites were
located through analysis of historic mapping and during the course of the walkover survey and
one from aerial photographs. Full site descriptions and locations can be seen in Appendix B.
Within the report, the bracketed numbers after site descriptions relate to those allocated to
individual sites in Appendix B and on Figure 2.

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